July 11, 2014

A Masochists FUN: The Pedal Board Rebuild

      Oh the oy!
       
Assembling a pedal board is one of three banes of my existence. Mosquitoes and replacing the string on an Ernie Ball volume pedal are the other two.

PEDAL     BOARD    REBUILD
|ˈpedl|  |bôrd|  |rēˈbild|    
verb:  the reassembling, cleaning and maitainance of a board with guitar effect pedals or sawing a steak knife between your toes.

 
      
                                                       

Why do I dislike the pedal board redo?

- Even ordering ahead of time, I never have all the supplies needed.

- It's a logistical nightmare.

- It's time consuming.

- And it's likely I'm going to do this all over again in a year or two.



While one can learn something new during rebuilds, there's always a new challenge. It's incredibly labor intensive and there's a headache waiting to happen in the decision making process.

 Not to mention there's this:
"Damn, I gotta run to Radio Shack and Lowe's again."

For the working musician, pedal boards take a beating and they need maintenance. I must admit, I could do better in the upkeep category.
   

I'll look at a loose pedal coming off the board and think, "That's an easy fix, I'll do it later" and run to the next session. After a while, the pedal next to that will get banged around from the first loose pedal and it'll start freeing itself from it's velcro chains. Then, a stretched cable between those pedals will develop a short and yet another pedal comes loose. The next thing you know, it looks and sounds like a hell hole down there!


The board takes on a life of it's own... Real estate issues mysteriously form, magnetic dirt particles settle, intermittent wiring problems, materialized stains of an unknown origin, you find what looks like Dorito chip crumbs and you don't eat Dorito's...




And when it comes to powering that "Three Ring Circus" of sound, nothing on a board is standard aside from the Boss style power cables.

Yep, there's always a new wall wart to deal with...  9v, 9.6v, 15v, 18v, 24v 300-1500ma. AC, DC, arrrgh!

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              
                            Perhaps I'm not doing this right... I'll pay someone to do it next year.
                                                            Where's that steak knife?